The race thickens

State Sen. Michael Merrifield, who pushed for dramatic cuts in testing, considers gubernatorial run

PHOTO: Nicholas Garcia
State Sen. Michael Merrifield, center, at a committee hearing on the nation's new education laws on Dec. 13.

A second Colorado lawmaker with deep ties to public education is considering a run for the governor’s mansion in 2018.

State Sen. Michael Merrifield of Colorado Springs confirmed to Chalkbeat he is weighing joining what could a crowded Democratic primary as a voice for the party’s progressive wing.

One of Merrifield’s Democratic colleagues from the Senate Education Committee is also considering a run — outgoing Sen. Michael Johnston, the standard bearer for the state’s education reform movement. The two lawmakers often clashed on policies such as linking teacher evaluations to student academic growth.

Others who have been mentioned as potential Democratic candidates include former U.S. Sen. and Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar, U.S. Rep. Ed Perlmutter and former state treasurer Cary Kennedy.

Merrifield, a former music teacher who has served on both the House and Senate education committees, said he’s been encouraged to run by Democrats across the state after November’s election.

“I think the state party has been far too Denver-centric for a number of years,” he said, suggesting the state’s Democrats have abandoned rural parts of the state and labor organizations. “I think Democrats need to get back to their roots.”

Merrifield, 69, said he believes he can rally the growing progressive wing of the Democratic Party in Colorado that supported U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders during the presidential primaries. Sanders won the Colorado presidential caucus.

“Many of those names being bandied about will have difficulty arousing excitement from the base,” he said. “And that’s one thing that I’ve always been able to do in all of my races: get support from unions, and teachers, and mom and pop business owners.”

Merrifield is considered among the most liberal of Democrat lawmakers in the General Assembly. But his Senate district is split almost evenly among Democrats, Republicans and unaffiliated voters.

On education issues, Merrifield has staunchly opposed numerous education reform efforts and has proposed bills to slash the amount of standardized testing in schools.

What would a Merrifield governorship mean for the state’s public schools?

“It’d be a wonderful thing for public education, with a capital P-U-B-L-I-C education,” he said. “It’d not be a very good thing for those who want to privatize, corporatize, ‘voucherize’ and ‘charterize’ public education.”

Merrifield said he didn’t know when he’d make a decision. Among the factors he’s raising is whether he can raise the kind of money needed to mount a statewide campaign.

“It would be a huge undertaking,” Merrifield said. “I think so far, what I’m seeing is a path. Not a well-beaten path, but a path through the forest.” first reported Merrifield’s potential gubernatorial run.


Aurora’s superintendent will get a contract extension

Aurora Public Schools Superintendent Rico Munn. (Photo by Andy Cross/The Denver Post)

The Aurora school board is offering superintendent Rico Munn a contract extension.

Marques Ivey, the school board president, made the announcement during Tuesday’s regular board meeting.

“The board of education believes we are headed in the right direction,” Ivey said. Munn can keep the district going in the right direction, he added.

The contract extension has not been approved yet. Munn said Tuesday night that it had been sent to his lawyer, but he had not had time to review it.

Munn took the leadership position in Aurora Public Schools in 2013. His current contract is set to expire at the end of June.

Munn indicated he intends to sign the new contract after he has time to review it. If he does so, district leaders expect the contract to be on the agenda of the board’s next meeting, April 3, for a first review, and then for a vote at the following meeting.

Details about the new offer, including the length of the extension or any salary increases, have not been made public.

Four of the seven members currently on the board were elected in November as part of a union-supported slate. Many voiced disapproval of some of the superintendent’s reform strategies such as his invitation to charter school network DSST to open in Aurora.

In their first major vote as a new board, the board also voted against the superintendent’s recommendation for the turnaround of an elementary school, signaling a disagreement with the district’s turnaround strategies.

But while several Aurora schools remain low performing, last year the district earned a high enough rating from the state to avoid a path toward state action.

cooling off

New York City charter leader Eva Moskowitz says Betsy DeVos is not ‘ready for prime time’

PHOTO: Chalkbeat
Success Academy CEO and founder Eva Moskowitz seemed to be cooling her support for U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos.

In New York City, Eva Moskowitz has been a lone voice of support for the controversial U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. But even Moskowitz appears to be cooling on the secretary following an embarrassing interview.

“I believe her heart is in the right place,” Moskowitz, founder and CEO of Success Academy, said of DeVos at an unrelated press conference. “But as the recent interviews indicate, I don’t believe she’s ready for primetime in terms of answering all of the complex questions that need to be answered on the topic of public education and choice.”

That is an apparent reference to DeVos’s roundly criticized appearance on 60 Minutes, which recently aired a 30-minute segment in which the secretary admits she hasn’t visited struggling schools in her tenure. Even advocates of school choice, DeVos’s signature issue, called her performance an “embarrassment,” and “Saturday Night Live” poked fun at her.  

Moskowitz’s comments are an about-face from when the education secretary was first appointed. While the rest of the New York City charter school community was mostly quiet after DeVos was tapped for the position, Moskowitz was the exception, tweeting that she was “thrilled.” She doubled-down on her support months later in an interview with Chalkbeat.

“I believe that education reform has to be a bipartisan issue,” she said.

During Monday’s press conference, which Success Academy officials called to push the city for more space for its growing network, Moskowitz also denied rumors, fueled by a tweet from AFT President Randi Weingarten, that Success officials had recently met with members of the Trump administration.

Shortly after the election, Moskowitz met with Trump amid speculation she was being considered for the education secretary position. This time around, she said it was “untrue” that any visits had taken place.

“You all know that a while back, I was asked to meet with the president-elect. I thought it was important to take his call,” she said. “I was troubled at the time by the Trump administration. I’m even more troubled now. And so, there has been no such meeting.”