First Person

Editor's blog: National School Choice Week runs political gamut

In case you didn’t know, this week is National School Choice Week.  Today also happens to be National Reading Day, and National Handwriting Day. Last week was Penguin Awareness Day but you’ve now missed that.

It’s debatable whether all these designated events truly raise awareness or cause people to think differently. It seems there’s a “day” for everything. For me, it’s “I Need a Blog Post Idea Right Now” Day, and school choice is pretty darn important, regardless of how you feel about it.

So, if you want to jump on the choice bandwagon or if you are already a true believer and want to support the cause, then you might want to know about things happening around here.

Choice attracts interesting bedfellows

As part of National School Choice Week, Americans for Prosperity Foundation-Colorado and talk radio 710 KNUS are hosting a live telecast featuring political commentators Dick Morris (a Fox News political commentator who once worked for Bill Clinton but later became one of Hillary Clinton’s staunchest critics), Hugh Hewitt, an outspoken Republican, evangelical Christian talk radio host, and chairman of the Colorado State Board of Education (and former Republican Congressman) Bob Schaffer  “to do even more to support the teachers and the schools that are succeeding, and hold those that are failing firmly accountable.”

Cherry Creek science and technology buildingDespite calls for bipartisan support for choice, this particular event appears to have a specific agenda. Just look up the sponsor organization websites if you want bone up on the latest anti-Obama rhetoric. The groups are pushing a message that is clearly pro-market, anti-big government (or possibly any government) and definitely anti-union. For the record, Gov. Hickenlooper does not plan to attend, despite his endorsement of National School Choice Week.

“It’s time to put children first in the education policy debate, not the adults and not the unions,” Jeff Crank, AFP Foundation-Colorado state director, said in a statement.

Pitched as the week’s “kickoff event” in Colorado, the live telecast will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 24, at the Douglas County Events Center, 500 Fairgrounds Dr., in Castle Rock. The program will be telecasted live on the Internet at www.PutKidsFirst.com.

The location, of course, is also strategic as Dougco finds itself in the midst of a vigorous debate about school choice and vouchers in particular.

You may recall that a judge declared the school district’s voucher pilot unconstitutional in August. So, the district’s much ballyhooed Choice Scholarship Pilot Program, which happens to be the state’s first district-run voucher plan, remains in legal limbo. A decision from the Colorado Court of Appeals is not expected before March.

School choice proponents add voices to chorus

Similar “pro-school choice” events are happening across the country. Last year, National School Choice Week hosted events in 40 states and the District of Columbia, with the governors of 10 states officially recognizing the week – including Gov. Hickenlooper. Denver Mayor Michael Hancock also signed a proclamation recognizing the week.

On the national scale, organizers say National School Choice Week is planned by “a diverse and nonpartisan coalition of individuals and organizations with more than 180 partner organizations.” See for yourself by checking out this  complete list of partners http://www.schoolchoiceweek.com/who_s_in.

It will be interesting to see if the event in Castle Rock brings out a similarly diverse group of choice advocates. There are odd bedfellows indeed in the school choice movement.

National School Choice Week kicked off at a special event in New Orleans on Saturday. (See video above – and yes those are The Temptations). Bill Cosby got on board, saying, “I strongly support National School Choice Week because all children in America should be able to access the best schools possible. We have a moral and societal obligation to give our children the opportunity to succeed in school, at work, and in life. We cannot meet that obligation unless parents are empowered to select the best schools of their children.”

Don’t care about school choice? Bust out a pencil with your kid and write some cursive. (But wait, I don’t think that’s taught in schools anymore… ) Or read a book. Now that’s a safe bet.

Other National School Choice Week events

 

First Person

With roots in Cuba and Spain, Newark student came to America to ‘shine bright’

PHOTO: Patrick Wall
Layla Gonzalez

This is my story of how we came to America and why.

I am from Mallorca, Spain. I am also from Cuba, because of my dad. My dad is from Cuba and my grandmother, grandfather, uncle, aunt, and so on. That is what makes our family special — we are different.

We came to America when my sister and I were little girls. My sister was three and I was one.

The first reason why we came here to America was for a better life. My parents wanted to raise us in a better place. We also came for better jobs and better pay so we can keep this family together.

We also came here to have more opportunities — they do call this country the “Land Of Opportunities.” We came to make our dreams come true.

In addition, my family and I came to America for adventure. We came to discover new things, to be ourselves, and to be free.

Moreover, we also came here to learn new things like English. When we came here we didn’t know any English at all. It was really hard to learn a language that we didn’t know, but we learned.

Thank God that my sister and I learned quickly so we can go to school. I had a lot of fun learning and throughout the years we do learn something new each day. My sister and I got smarter and smarter and we made our family proud.

When my sister Amira and I first walked into Hawkins Street School I had the feeling that we were going to be well taught.

We have always been taught by the best even when we don’t realize. Like in the times when we think we are in trouble because our parents are mad. Well we are not in trouble, they are just trying to teach us something so that we don’t make the same mistake.

And that is why we are here to learn something new each day.

Sometimes I feel like I belong here and that I will be alright. Because this is the land where you can feel free to trust your first instinct and to be who you want to be and smile bright and look up and say, “Thank you.”

As you can see, this is why we came to America and why we can shine bright.

Layla Gonzalez is a fourth-grader at Hawkins Street School. This essay is adapted from “The Hispanic American Dreams of Hawkins Street School,” a self-published book by the school’s students and staff that was compiled by teacher Ana Couto.

First Person

From ‘abandoned’ to ‘blessed,’ Newark teacher sees herself in her students

PHOTO: Patrick Wall
Jennifer Palumbo

As I sit down to write about my journey to the USA, all I can think of is the word “blessed.”

You see my story to become Ms. Palumbo started as a whole other person with a different name in a different country. I was born in Bogota, Colombia, but my parents either could not keep me or did not want me. I was, according to my adoption papers, “abandoned.” Abandoned is defined as “having been deserted or cast off.” Not a great start to my story, I know.

Well I was then put in an orphanage for children who had no family. Yes at this point I had no family, no home, not even a name.
I spent the first 10 months of my life in this orphanage. Most children at 10 months are crawling, trying to talk, holding their bottles, and some are even walking. Since I spent 10 months laying in a crib, I did none of those things.

Despite that my day to be chosen arrived. I was adopted by an Italian American couple who, after walking up and down rows of babies and children, chose to adopt me. My title just changed from abandoned to chosen.

But that wasn’t the only thing about to change. My first baby passport to leave Colombia is with the name given by the orphanage to an abandoned baby girl with no one. When I arrived in America my parents changed that name to Jennifer Marie Palumbo and began my citizenship and naturalization paperwork so I could become an U.S. citizen.

They tried to make a little Colombian girl an Italian American, so I was raised speaking only English. Eating lots of pasta and living a typical American lifestyle. But as I grew up I knew there was something more — I was something more.

By fourth grade, I gravitated to the Spanish girls that moved into town and spent many after-schools and sleepovers looking to understand who I was. I began to learn how to dance to Spanish music and eat Spanish foods.

I would try to speak and understand the language the best I could even though I could not use it at home. In middle school, high school, and three semesters at Kean University, I studied Spanish. I traveled to Puerto Rico, Mexico, and Honduras to explore Spanish culture and language. I finally felt like the missing piece of my puzzle was filled.

And then the opportunity to come to Hawkins Street School came and as what — a bilingual second-grade teacher. I understood these students in a way that is hard to explain.

They are like me but in a way backwards.

They are fluent in Spanish and hungry to obtain fluency in English to succeed in the world. I was fluent in English with a hunger to obtain it in Spanish to succeed in the world. I feel as a child I lost out.

My road until now has by far not been an easy one, but I am a blessed educated Hispanic American. I know that my road is not over. There are so many places to see, so many food to taste, and so many songs to dance too.

I thank my students over the past four years for being such a big part of this little “abandoned” baby who became a “chosen” child grown into a “blessed teacher.” They fill my heart and I will always be here to help them have a blessed story because the stars are in their reach no matter what language barrier is there.

We can break through!

Palumbo is a second-grade bilingual teacher Hawkins Street School. This essay is from “The Hispanic American Dreams of Hawkins Street School,” a self-published book by the school’s students and staff that was compiled by teacher Ana Couto.