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Teachers march during a rally for more educational funding at the Colorado State Capitol in April 2018.

Teachers march during a rally for more educational funding at the Colorado State Capitol in April 2018.

AAron Ontiveroz/The Denver Post

Colorado teachers are rallying at the Capitol for more funding and higher pay. Follow the protest here.

Droves of Colorado teachers protested at the state Capitol on Thursday, joining a national moment of educator activism. The rally is expected to continue Friday.

Their asks: more money for schools, higher pay, protection for retirement benefits.

Teachers from two of the state’s largest school districts — Jeffco Public Schools and the Douglas County School District — gathered at the Capitol at 9 a.m., Thursday. They were joined by teachers from two rural school districts: Lake County and Clear Creek. Another rally took place in the afternoon.

At one point teachers shouted, “We’re mad as hell! And we’re not going to take it anymore!”

On Friday, teachers from more than two dozen school districts — including Denver Public Schools — are expected to converge on Capitol Hill. In light of the number of teachers rallying at the Capitol, school has been canceled for more than 600,000 Colorado students.

Chalkbeat reporters are filing live updates from the Capitol below. You can also follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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