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Weekend reads: How Denver students are analyzing the gentrification in their own neighborhoods

House Speaker Brian Bosma, appearing here at a Chalkbeat event on school funding, said voucher accountability is a worthy issue.
House Speaker Brian Bosma, appearing here at a Chalkbeat event on school funding, said voucher accountability is a worthy issue.
Hayleigh Colombo

Editor’s note: Weekend reads is coming to you a day early this week. That’s because the Chalkbeat offices are going to be closed Friday in observance of the July 4 holiday. Have a safe and happy holiday. We’ll see you back here on Monday!

  • Hillary Clinton will likely depart significantly from the Obama administration on education policy, but it’s still difficult to predict what concrete policy solutions she might propose. (New Republic)
  • U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan remembers Ron Thorpe, the president and CEO of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, who died this week of lung cancer. (USDOE)
  • After 44 years, Sonia Manzano — better known as Maria on “Sesame Street” — is retiring. (NYMag)
  • Students at a Denver high school (that has already seen a lot of change) are using their AP Human Geography class to examine the gentrification that is taking hold in their own neighborhood. (Westword)
  • The U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear a challenge to a 40-year old precedent that allows unions to charge non-members service fees, a case that could have big implications for teachers unions. (EdWeek)
  • Here’s how one Michigan elementary school not only brought its English language learners to read on grade level, but is now competing with its district’s more affluent schools. (The Bridge)
  • An interview with Morgan Polikoff, the education policy researcher who is becoming a prolific commenter not just on policy but also on how journalists cover policy. (The Grade)
  • A radio reporting project to cover education in the Southeast is starting again after a rocky first round. (Current)
  • An argument against “D” grades, which signify almost-failure but don’t require students to try harder. (Atlantic)
  • Children’s books that celebrate the Confederacy are out there. Here’s what they’re like. (Slate)
  • An aspiring teacher considers the ways that educators can speed up or slow down time in the classroom through the theory of Flow. (Magnifying Minds)
  • Imprisoned gangster Whitey Bulger confessed his life of crime to high school students who wrote to him for a class project. (Boston Globe)
  • Although both have measurably positive effects, careful study shows often-cut music programs have far greater long-term impact for students than rarely-cut football programs. (EdWeek)
  • It might be the end for for-profit colleges (Talking Points Memo)
  • A former clerk for Ruth Bader Ginsberg tells what the Supreme Court justice taught him about the relationship between gender equity and being a stay-at-home dad. (The Atlantic)

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