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U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan posed for a selfie with students in Colorado Springs last year.

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan posed for a selfie with students in Colorado Springs last year.

Nicholas Garcia

Weekend Reads: How far is too far when preventing students from failing?

  • A focus on keeping students on track in ninth grade is driving Chicago’s graduation rate up — and raising questions about the lengths schools should go to prevent failing grades. (The Atlantic)
  • A Silicon Valley foundation has produced a digital curriculum to prevent students from falling behind in math. (Hechinger Report
  • The path that led a student from Paraguay to a large high school in New York City highlights how hard it is for immigrant families to make good use of school choice. (Pacific Standard Magazine)
  • U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan’s children are leaving their Virginia public school for the Chicago private school where their mom will teach. (Politico)
  • A new approach to discipline called “Collaborative and Proactive Solutions” could reshape the way schools think about students who misbehave. (Mother Jones)
  • Few textbooks meet criteria that would define them as “Common Core-aligned,” but districts are buying them anyway. (The Daily Beast)
  • PARCC, the Common Core test that many states pledged to adopt but fewer are actually using, is a big loser in the backlash against top-down education policy making. (Boston Globe)
  • Here are three reasons why schools are unlikely to offer inclusive LGBT curriculums even after the Supreme Court’s historic marriage ruling. (EdWeek
  • To help them learn coding, every seventh-grader in the United Kingdom will get a credit card-sized computer. (Wired)
  • The world’s oldest man until he died this week was a retired teacher from Japan. (AP)
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