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Weekend Reads: Why parent involvement may not matter (and why it still might matter a lot)

Freshman wait for school to start at DSST Cole High.
Freshman wait for school to start at DSST Cole High.
  • A new study found that many kinds of parental involvement in students’ educations result in few academic benefits. (Atlantic)
  • But that conclusion may have been drawn from a flawed measure of what parental involvement really looks like. (New York Times)
  • A new poll reports that while a plurality of white parents oppose the Common Core, a majority of black and Hispanic parents support the standards. (Hechinger Report)
  • This week’s conviction of 11 Atlanta educators on racketeering charges related to test score tampering is an example of Campbell’s Law in practice. (Atlantic)
  • Former New York City schools Chancellor Joel Klein responds to a critique that he unfairly casts opponents to his reforms as cynical and self-interested. (New York Review of Books)
  • High levels of teacher turnover cost school districts upwards of $2.2 billion a year, says a researcher studying teacher retention and churn. (NPR Ed)
  • Ten years after Hurricane Katrina, the long-term affects of the disruption in New Orleans students’ education can be seen in high youth unemployment. (Hechinger Report)
  • Success Academy Charter Schools founder Eva Moskowitz criticizes New York City’s proposed new school discipline policy and similar restorative models as too lax. (Wall Street Journal)
  • Louisville, Kentucky provides a rare case study in successful school integration. (Atlantic)
  • New research suggests that while more education could improve the lives of middle- and lower-income Americans, it’s likely not a solution to rising inequality, which is being driven by sharp increases in wealth among the already-very-rich. (New York Times)

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